Register    Login    Forum    Search    FAQ

Board index » GENERAL CHAT » The news stand




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 543 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19  Next

Share On:

Author Message
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 02, 2018 12:24 pm 
Offline
Manager
Manager
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2004 7:19 am
Posts: 22597
Location: Cannock.
Jeremy Corbyn's support of Britain being a member of a post Brexit customs union with the EU is subject to two important caveats.

The first is that Britain would be able to negotiate agreement of new trade deals in our national interest.

The second is that Labour would be able to stop the tide of privatisation and outsourcing and be able to provide state aid to industry where necessary.

_________________
Wolves fans, this is your day. Its going to be emotional.

If team culture is weak losing divides the team. If team culture is strong, losing creates the hunger to win again. Either way culture rules.


Top 
 Profile  
 
Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Twitter Twitter
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 02, 2018 12:28 pm 
Offline
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator

Joined: Sun Mar 12, 2006 6:09 pm
Posts: 20429
Location: Four Oaks
knocker knowles wrote:
Jeremy Corbyn's support of Britain being a member of a post Brexit customs union with the EU is subject to two important caveats.

The first is that Britain would be able to negotiate agreement of new trade deals in our national interest.

The second is that Labour would be able to stop the tide of privatisation and outsourcing and be able to provide state aid to industry where necessary.


Look to me like the sort of caveats that would prevent an agreement.

_________________
The next level awaits - Euros now


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 02, 2018 1:27 pm 
Offline
Manager
Manager

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 1:38 am
Posts: 15298
Location: Moved
Left back wrote:
knocker knowles wrote:
Jeremy Corbyn's support of Britain being a member of a post Brexit customs union with the EU is subject to two important caveats.

The first is that Britain would be able to negotiate agreement of new trade deals in our national interest.

The second is that Labour would be able to stop the tide of privatisation and outsourcing and be able to provide state aid to industry where necessary.


Look to me like the sort of caveats that would prevent an agreement.


Easy to suggest the unworkable when not in power

_________________
Dyslexics are teople poo


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 02, 2018 2:03 pm 
Offline
Assistant Manager
Assistant Manager

Joined: Sat Feb 13, 2010 5:46 pm
Posts: 3586
knocker knowles wrote:
Jeremy Corbyn's support of Britain being a member of a post Brexit customs union with the EU is subject to two important caveats.

The first is that Britain would be able to negotiate agreement of new trade deals in our national interest.

The second is that Labour would be able to stop the tide of privatisation and outsourcing and be able to provide state aid to industry where necessary.


Hopefully we will never be in a position to see him attempt the negotiation.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 02, 2018 5:27 pm 
Offline
Manager
Manager
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2008 10:28 pm
Posts: 11170
suiging wrote:
shropswolf wrote:
suiging wrote:
With all these calls coming in from diehard remainers for a second referendum, I wonder why they feel it is so crucial in terms of the UK's electorate to turn to them at this time ?

No one asked us if we wished to join in 1972, Edward "Euro loving" Heath, just did it. When we were asked if we wished to remain in 1975 over sixty percent of the sixty percent who voted wished to stay...Job done. However in 1980, only 26% of a National Poll wished to stay. This overwhelming majority were ignored. No calls from the gravy trainers then, that our freedoms were being glossed over. The political elite turned a blind eye.

Where were the people making the most noise now about a second referendum, when the overwhelming majority of the Nation wished to leave ? It seems the public only matter when things haven't quite gone their way. They knew better in 1980, they know better now. Absolutely nothing about "The People's Choice" just as ever- self-interest.


Surely the difference now is that the process of leaving has been put into action and people are perhaps seeing that it is not the simple process that they had expected (due to the misleading statements by the Leave campaign), but actually has very deep and complicated consequences.

In addition, the vote result was not a decisive 74/26 as you cite as public opinion in 1980, but 51.9/48.1 and on a turnout of less than 72 percent.

Why would you worry about a second referendum anyway though?

Even Farage has advocated it as he is convinced it would be an even more compelling victory for his side of the fight. Or is Farage just exhibiting "self interest" too? Hmm.


The percentages are public record. I suppose it's just interpretation and choice of which record you choose to believe.


You misunderstood me. I was referring to the vote result in 2016, which was far less clear cut as the figures you cite from 1980.

There won't be a second referendum anyway.. I'm really not sure why you worry yourself about it. The government committed to following through the non-binding referendum result and has triggered Article 50 so the UK will leave the EU in barely 12 months' time from now.

_________________
Wolves' Head of Football Development & Recruitment Kevin Thelwell added: "Grant Holt has been at a lot of clubs and there is a reason for that - he is a very good player."


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 9:57 am 
Offline
Manager
Manager
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2004 7:19 am
Posts: 22597
Location: Cannock.
Mays position, wanting out of the customs union, single market while retaining close trade relations.

The problem is that the position is self contradictory.

In order to integrate economically you have to align regulations, otherwise there exists an imbalance which unfairly favours one side over another.

_________________
Wolves fans, this is your day. Its going to be emotional.

If team culture is weak losing divides the team. If team culture is strong, losing creates the hunger to win again. Either way culture rules.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 12:23 pm 
Offline
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator

Joined: Sun Mar 12, 2006 6:09 pm
Posts: 20429
Location: Four Oaks
knocker knowles wrote:
Mays position, wanting out of the customs union, single market while retaining close trade relations.

The problem is that the position is self contradictory.

In order to integrate economically you have to align regulations, otherwise there exists an imbalance which unfairly favours one side over another.


Yes, it's the same contradiction as Corbyn's first caveat you posted above. He wants IN but freedom from the regulations to allow trade elsewhere. (well actually I'm not convinced that's what he does want but he sees that stance as his best hope of toppling May and becoming PM).

_________________
The next level awaits - Euros now


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2018 9:48 pm 
Offline
Assistant Manager
Assistant Manager
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2008 10:15 am
Posts: 3888
Location: London
knocker knowles wrote:
Mays position, wanting out of the customs union, single market while retaining close trade relations.

The problem is that the position is self contradictory.

In order to integrate economically you have to align regulations, otherwise there exists an imbalance which unfairly favours one side over another.


A lot of trade regulations are done at a global level, above the EU. Frankly who cares if we have the same standards on washing machines, sensible.

_________________
Image

http://www.steadfasttrust.org.uk/


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Tue Mar 06, 2018 8:07 am 
Offline
Manager
Manager
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2004 7:19 am
Posts: 22597
Location: Cannock.
It seems to me the UK just doesn't get it, you cant cherry pick parts that suit you without accepting parts that don't.

It all looks like the right wing media will look to blame Barnier, create the bad guy and scapegoat.

Meanwhile the UK government tries to be all things to all men, pie in the sky thinking.

The clocks ticking, get your heads out of the sand.

Study the detail.

_________________
Wolves fans, this is your day. Its going to be emotional.

If team culture is weak losing divides the team. If team culture is strong, losing creates the hunger to win again. Either way culture rules.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Tue Mar 06, 2018 9:22 am 
Offline
Manager
Manager

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 1:38 am
Posts: 15298
Location: Moved
knocker knowles wrote:
It seems to me the UK just doesn't get it, you cant cherry pick parts that suit you without accepting parts that don't.

It all looks like the right wing media will look to blame Barnier, create the bad guy and scapegoat.

Meanwhile the UK government tries to be all things to all men, pie in the sky thinking.

The clocks ticking, get your heads out of the sand.

Study the detail.


With your above post logical and to the most part sensible. With it in mind, explain Labour's position on the single market.

_________________
Dyslexics are teople poo


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Tue Mar 06, 2018 4:31 pm 
Offline
Manager
Manager
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2005 4:17 pm
Posts: 4561
Today in the reality of Brexit.

Our 'best mates, who will magically make Brexit fine' are looking out for themselves (shocking, right?).

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/5733920/w ... ve-europe/

If only there was a way for us to band together with other countries to stand up to bullies and get ourselves the best deals :D

Also...

https://www.theguardian.com/science/201 ... nd-science


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 11:58 am 
Offline
Manager
Manager
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2008 10:28 pm
Posts: 11170
Quote:
When historians examine Britain’s departure from the European Union, one of the things that will puzzle them is the behaviour of the Conservative Party. Thanks to copious demographic and geographical analysis, we are already in a position to make sense of the referendum result itself. But it remains difficult to grasp how the Tories could effectively have taken what was to everyone else a fringe issue and used it to attack the interests they had until very recently represented: the City of London, big business, the Union, even Whitehall.

To paraphrase Neil Kinnock, how did we end up in the grotesque chaos of a Conservative government – a Conservative government – setting about the seemingly deliberate demolition of the United Kingdom and its economy? From a Tory perspective, things must have reached a sorry pass when the sole voice speaking up for the Union belongs to Arlene Foster.

However much energy the Leave campaign put into stirring up nationalist and anti-immigration sentiment, it is hard to see the Westminster Brexiteers as nationalists when they show so little regard for the integrity of the UK or its governing institutions. If the economic forecasts are remotely accurate, Brexit will render England, let alone the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, a hoax nation. The most regionally imbalanced nation in Europe will become even more so, as the North suffers yet further decline while the South-East holds on. Much of South Wales and Northern Ireland will exist in a parallel economic universe to London.

What do they want, these Brexiteers? The fantasies of hardliners such as Liam Fox, Daniel Hannan and Jacob Rees-Mogg are based on dimly learned lessons from British history. The mantra of ‘Global Britain’ resurrects an ideal of laissez-faire from the era of Manchester cotton mills and New World slavery.

Do they even believe the myth, or is it an expedient way of bashing opponents while pursuing some ulterior goal? Historical re-enactment may be fine for the Daily Mail and the grassroots, but it doesn’t seem a strong enough motivation to support a professional political career. We need to know not just what kind of past the Brexiteers imagine, but what kind of future they are after. One disconcerting possibility is that figures such as Fox and Rees-Mogg might be willing to believe the dismal economic forecasts, but look on them as an attraction.

This isn’t as implausible as it may sound. Since the 1960s, conservatism has been defined partly by a greater willingness to inflict harm, especially in the English-speaking world. The logic is that the augmentation of the postwar welfare state by the moral pluralism of the 1960s produced an acute problem of ‘moral hazard’, whereby benign policies ended up being taken for granted and abused. Once people believe things can be had for free and take pleasure in abundance, there is a risk of idleness and hedonism.

As the theory behind Thatcherism had it, government services shrink everybody’s incentives to produce, compete and invest. They reduce the motivation for businesses to deliver services, and ordinary people’s desire to work. Toughness, even pain, performs an important moral and psychological function in pushing people to come up with solutions.

An alternative perspective is that hardship has forced people into worse jobs, demanding fewer skills and lower capital investment, so that Britain’s productivity growth has stalled to a degree not seen since the Industrial Revolution.

There seems little doubt that for many of Thatcher’s followers the free-market experiment hasn’t gone far enough. As long as there is an NHS, a welfare state and a public sector that is more European than American in scale, we will never truly discover what the British people are made of, because they will never be forced to find out.

Steve Bannon, the former Trump strategist, has often voiced the opinion that America’s only hope of moral cleansing lies in war. Tory Brexiteers tend not to go that far, but they may well be holding out for a milder version of the same idea, an extreme of economic hardship that means government is no longer capable of picking up the pieces.

No wonder families in County Durham or the Welsh Valleys have experienced multiple generations of unemployment, they argue: there’s been adequate unemployment benefit. The estimated £80 billion hit to the public finances caused by Brexit might change that. And that’s before we take up the suggestive comment lurking in the official forecasts that ‘leaving the European Union could provide the UK with an opportunity to regulate differently across social, environmental, energy, consumer and product standards.’

The optimistic version of this story is that it’s only when the chips are down we discover what people are truly capable of. Brexit might reveal reserves of courage and innovation that have lain dormant for decades, held back by the interferences of bureaucracy and public spending.

And if it doesn’t? Well, then the truth is laid bare. Perhaps that will be the moment for a more heroic form of political leadership to rise from the ashes. Several prominent Tory Brexiteers, including Iain Duncan-Smith and Steve Baker, have military backgrounds. As with the Second World War, Brexit will perform an X-ray of our collective moral fibre.


In full: https://www.lrb.co.uk/v40/n05/william-d ... they-after

_________________
Wolves' Head of Football Development & Recruitment Kevin Thelwell added: "Grant Holt has been at a lot of clubs and there is a reason for that - he is a very good player."


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 7:57 am 
Offline
Manager
Manager
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2004 7:19 am
Posts: 22597
Location: Cannock.
Really looking forward to seeing how much truth the UK media give the general public as the European Union tell it as it is.

The Tories shouldn't be allowed to hide from the hard harsh facts.


Next, there was the test of integrity of the Single Market. No Member State is free to pick only those sectors of the Single Market it likes, nor to accept the role of the ECJ only when it suits their interest. By the same token, a pick-and-mix approach for a non-member state is out of the question. We are not going to sacrifice these principles. It's simply not in our interest.

D. Tusk.

_________________
Wolves fans, this is your day. Its going to be emotional.

If team culture is weak losing divides the team. If team culture is strong, losing creates the hunger to win again. Either way culture rules.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 9:47 am 
Offline
Manager
Manager

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 1:38 am
Posts: 15298
Location: Moved
knocker knowles wrote:
Really looking forward to seeing how much truth the UK media give the general public as the European Union tell it as it is.

The Tories shouldn't be allowed to hide from the hard harsh facts.


Next, there was the test of integrity of the Single Market. No Member State is free to pick only those sectors of the Single Market it likes, nor to accept the role of the ECJ only when it suits their interest. By the same token, a pick-and-mix approach for a non-member state is out of the question. We are not going to sacrifice these principles. It's simply not in our interest.

D. Tusk.


Are Hong Kong, Singapore, New York etc etc, confined by EU regulations in their white collar sectors ? Global finance is carried out in a nano second by the click of a button. Even the ludicrous proximity arguments on trade, have no meaning in finance. Yes the EU is a large trading block, but when stacked against Asia. The Americas, the Middle East, the rest of the bloody world, who all trust and use the UK's financial services, it can blow as much as it likes. They are well aware of the consequences of not having a partner the size of the UK, with the experience of the UK in world finance.

Pure drivel from Tusk

_________________
Dyslexics are teople poo


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Wed Mar 14, 2018 12:30 pm 
Offline
Manager
Manager
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2004 7:19 am
Posts: 22597
Location: Cannock.
suiging wrote:
knocker knowles wrote:
Really looking forward to seeing how much truth the UK media give the general public as the European Union tell it as it is.

The Tories shouldn't be allowed to hide from the hard harsh facts.


Next, there was the test of integrity of the Single Market. No Member State is free to pick only those sectors of the Single Market it likes, nor to accept the role of the ECJ only when it suits their interest. By the same token, a pick-and-mix approach for a non-member state is out of the question. We are not going to sacrifice these principles. It's simply not in our interest.

D. Tusk.


Are Hong Kong, Singapore, New York etc etc, confined by EU regulations in their white collar sectors ? Global finance is carried out in a nano second by the click of a button. Even the ludicrous proximity arguments on trade, have no meaning in finance. Yes the EU is a large trading block, but when stacked against Asia. The Americas, the Middle East, the rest of the bloody world, who all trust and use the UK's financial services, it can blow as much as it likes. They are well aware of the consequences of not having a partner the size of the UK, with the experience of the UK in world finance.

Pure drivel from Tusk


It will be an interesting development because the EU single currency bankers will be looking to move more and more financial transactions through Paris and Frankfurt.

_________________
Wolves fans, this is your day. Its going to be emotional.

If team culture is weak losing divides the team. If team culture is strong, losing creates the hunger to win again. Either way culture rules.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Wed Mar 14, 2018 3:31 pm 
Offline
Manager
Manager

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 1:38 am
Posts: 15298
Location: Moved
knocker knowles wrote:
suiging wrote:
knocker knowles wrote:
Really looking forward to seeing how much truth the UK media give the general public as the European Union tell it as it is.

The Tories shouldn't be allowed to hide from the hard harsh facts.


Next, there was the test of integrity of the Single Market. No Member State is free to pick only those sectors of the Single Market it likes, nor to accept the role of the ECJ only when it suits their interest. By the same token, a pick-and-mix approach for a non-member state is out of the question. We are not going to sacrifice these principles. It's simply not in our interest.

D. Tusk.


Are Hong Kong, Singapore, New York etc etc, confined by EU regulations in their white collar sectors ? Global finance is carried out in a nano second by the click of a button. Even the ludicrous proximity arguments on trade, have no meaning in finance. Yes the EU is a large trading block, but when stacked against Asia. The Americas, the Middle East, the rest of the bloody world, who all trust and use the UK's financial services, it can blow as much as it likes. They are well aware of the consequences of not having a partner the size of the UK, with the experience of the UK in world finance.

Pure drivel from Tusk


It will be an interesting development because the EU single currency bankers will be looking to move more and more financial transactions through Paris and Frankfurt.


Why ?

_________________
Dyslexics are teople poo


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Thu Mar 15, 2018 10:20 am 
Offline
Manager
Manager

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 1:38 am
Posts: 15298
Location: Moved
When France was subject to dastardly terrorist attacks, fellow EU States most notably GB, rushed to support her and offer any help possible.

See now how France responds to a FELLOW democratic nation in crisis.

:roll:

_________________
Dyslexics are teople poo


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Thu Mar 15, 2018 1:38 pm 
Offline
Manager
Manager
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2008 10:28 pm
Posts: 11170
suiging wrote:
When France was subject to dastardly terrorist attacks, fellow EU States most notably GB, rushed to support her and offer any help possible.

See now how France responds to a FELLOW democratic nation in crisis.

:roll:


Acts of terrorism by some random brainwashed losers aren't really comparable to the alleged state-ordered killing of former intelligence providers on foreign soil.

There's no politics involved in the former, whereas the latter is all about politics. In addition, the fact that the former had occurred was irrefutable, whereas the latter is at present merely a suspicion.

_________________
Wolves' Head of Football Development & Recruitment Kevin Thelwell added: "Grant Holt has been at a lot of clubs and there is a reason for that - he is a very good player."


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Thu Mar 15, 2018 11:25 pm 
Offline
Assistant Manager
Assistant Manager

Joined: Sat Feb 13, 2010 5:46 pm
Posts: 3586
It would.appear to be more than a suspicion tonight. Even Trump is backing the UK stance. Along with France and Germany this does give credence to the allegations.
Whichever way you look at it someone with the capability to make or resource the nerve agent used has acted with disregard for UK citizens ..That must surely have some state complicity if not direct involvement
The government needs to be seen to be acting.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 12:12 am 
Offline
Manager
Manager

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 1:38 am
Posts: 15298
Location: Moved
shropswolf wrote:
suiging wrote:
When France was subject to dastardly terrorist attacks, fellow EU States most notably GB, rushed to support her and offer any help possible.

See now how France responds to a FELLOW democratic nation in crisis.

:roll:


Acts of terrorism by some random brainwashed losers aren't really comparable to the alleged state-ordered killing of former intelligence providers on foreign soil.

There's no politics involved in the former, whereas the latter is all about politics. In addition, the fact that the former had occurred was irrefutable, whereas the latter is at present merely a suspicion.


Complex nerve agent is not available to the average man on the street .....surely ?

_________________
Dyslexics are teople poo


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 12:24 am 
Offline
Manager
Manager

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 1:38 am
Posts: 15298
Location: Moved
shropswolf wrote:
suiging wrote:
When France was subject to dastardly terrorist attacks, fellow EU States most notably GB, rushed to support her and offer any help possible.

See now how France responds to a FELLOW democratic nation in crisis.

:roll:


Acts of terrorism by some random brainwashed losers aren't really comparable to the alleged state-ordered killing of former intelligence providers on foreign soil.

There's no politics involved in the former, whereas the latter is all about politics. In addition, the fact that the former had occurred was irrefutable, whereas the latter is at present merely a suspicion.


This apologist line is quite sickening. The PM has not accused the Russian State of deploying the agent. She has said catagorically that she has evidence from where the nerve agent originated.. Evidence of who deployed it, has not yet come to the public domainThe question to Russia was simply if not You, how did you allow this agent to be used ? She received no reply.

Rolling over for a tummy tickle at this time, would probably not be in our nation's interest. Well that's what I would imagine.

_________________
Dyslexics are teople poo


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 10:29 am 
Offline
Manager
Manager
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2008 10:28 pm
Posts: 11170
suiging wrote:
shropswolf wrote:
suiging wrote:
When France was subject to dastardly terrorist attacks, fellow EU States most notably GB, rushed to support her and offer any help possible.

See now how France responds to a FELLOW democratic nation in crisis.

:roll:


Acts of terrorism by some random brainwashed losers aren't really comparable to the alleged state-ordered killing of former intelligence providers on foreign soil.

There's no politics involved in the former, whereas the latter is all about politics. In addition, the fact that the former had occurred was irrefutable, whereas the latter is at present merely a suspicion.


Complex nerve agent is not available to the average man on the street .....surely ?


The average man on the street no, but someone with a superior knowledge of chemistry would theoretically be capable (hasn't the guy who developed this particular chemical even published a whole book about how he did it?). The attackers who released a nerve agent on the Tokyo underground 20 years ago had manufactured it themselves.

Do you really think this is the finest job that the highly trained Russian secret service agents are capable of doing? Looks a messy bodge job.

It's a foolish battle for a country that's about to weaken itself both economically and politically to be taking on in any case.

_________________
Wolves' Head of Football Development & Recruitment Kevin Thelwell added: "Grant Holt has been at a lot of clubs and there is a reason for that - he is a very good player."


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 2:11 pm 
Offline
Manager
Manager

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 1:38 am
Posts: 15298
Location: Moved
Foolish battle ?

Speechless. :oops:

_________________
Dyslexics are teople poo


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 3:46 pm 
Offline
Manager
Manager
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2008 10:28 pm
Posts: 11170
suiging wrote:
Foolish battle ?

Speechless. :oops:


What do you honestly expect the UK to gain from taking on a conflict with Russia? What exactly is the political strategy here? And with what means do you expect the UK to impose itself?

Prince William not taking up the usual a freebie to watch us go out of the World Cup? :roll:

Let's face facts, the guy who was attacked was a traitor to his country and played with fire. If you play with fire, you tend to get burned eventually. Quite why such people are living out their lives in quiet little English towns like Salisbury is the shocking part of all this.

The best response now would be deescalation of the entire situation. The UK is in a very vulnerable position right now, to charge into unnecessary acts of aggression at such a time would be foolhardy.

_________________
Wolves' Head of Football Development & Recruitment Kevin Thelwell added: "Grant Holt has been at a lot of clubs and there is a reason for that - he is a very good player."


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 7:40 pm 
Offline
Manager
Manager

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 1:38 am
Posts: 15298
Location: Moved
I think you have to take the UK out of the scenario at the present time as Brexit fears or hopes cloud the issue.

No country can sit on it's hands when they are the benefactors of a nerve agent used on their soil.

The UK is not alone. As well as NATO, just about every civilised country on the planet has joined in the condemnation and expects the UK to stand up to any potential aggressors. History shows you what happens with appeasement of cold hearted dictators.

Yes, we as a stand alone country, are out of our depth. But we are not alone. The EU is nothing to do with our national defence, NATO and to a lesser extent the UN are.

This is not about economics and petty party politics. Russia hopes it will be. They must have been quite disconcerted when their puppets faced derision from within their own ranks, the smoke and mirrors it hoped and hopes to hide behind, for once aren't working

_________________
Dyslexics are teople poo


Last edited by suiging on Fri Mar 16, 2018 9:44 pm, edited 3 times in total.

Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 9:26 pm 
Offline
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator

Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2004 11:55 pm
Posts: 18043
shropswolf wrote:
suiging wrote:
Foolish battle ?

Speechless. :oops:


What do you honestly expect the UK to gain from taking on a conflict with Russia? What exactly is the political strategy here? And with what means do you expect the UK to impose itself?

Prince William not taking up the usual a freebie to watch us go out of the World Cup? :roll:

Let's face facts, the guy who was attacked was a traitor to his country and played with fire. If you play with fire, you tend to get burned eventually. Quite why such people are living out their lives in quiet little English towns like Salisbury is the shocking part of all this.

The best response now would be deescalation of the entire situation. The UK is in a very vulnerable position right now, to charge into unnecessary acts of aggression at such a time would be foolhardy.


Doing nothing is worse than doing something. You the public, we the public, only get to hear about a tenth of what the people in the know want you to know. The fact that Russia has been so publicly outed speaks volumes. Get behind your country and stop defending those that would seek to harm it with impunity.

_________________
There is no substitute for hard work.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 10:11 pm 
Offline
Manager
Manager
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2008 10:28 pm
Posts: 11170
Rozza wrote:
shropswolf wrote:
suiging wrote:
Foolish battle ?

Speechless. :oops:


What do you honestly expect the UK to gain from taking on a conflict with Russia? What exactly is the political strategy here? And with what means do you expect the UK to impose itself?

Prince William not taking up the usual a freebie to watch us go out of the World Cup? :roll:

Let's face facts, the guy who was attacked was a traitor to his country and played with fire. If you play with fire, you tend to get burned eventually. Quite why such people are living out their lives in quiet little English towns like Salisbury is the shocking part of all this.

The best response now would be deescalation of the entire situation. The UK is in a very vulnerable position right now, to charge into unnecessary acts of aggression at such a time would be foolhardy.


Doing nothing is worse than doing something. You the public, we the public, only get to hear about a tenth of what the people in the know want you to know. The fact that Russia has been so publicly outed speaks volumes. Get behind your country and stop defending those that would seek to harm it with impunity.


"Doing nothing is worse than doing something" sounds like a direct quote out of Alastair Campbell's case for the Iraq war.

Nobody's defending anyone who carries out attacks using nerve agents. But this isn't a football match on the box and "pick a side", while knocking back a few beers. This is big boys shit, as David Brent would say, and the wisest choose their battles carefully, not rush in head first.

Let's be honest, the UK has had, and likely still has, plenty of spies meddling in Russian affairs too.

There is really no strategic benefit to the UK of kicking up fuss with a global power like Russia except to score some brownie points from our "closest ally" and satisfy those who have never grasped that the Berlin Wall fell almost 3 decades ago.

_________________
Wolves' Head of Football Development & Recruitment Kevin Thelwell added: "Grant Holt has been at a lot of clubs and there is a reason for that - he is a very good player."


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 11:12 pm 
Offline
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator

Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2004 11:55 pm
Posts: 18043
shropswolf wrote:
"Doing nothing is worse than doing something" sounds like a direct quote out of Alastair Campbell's case for the Iraq war.

Nobody's defending anyone who carries out attacks using nerve agents. But this isn't a football match on the box and "pick a side", while knocking back a few beers. This is big boys shit, as David Brent would say, and the wisest choose their battles carefully, not rush in head first.

Let's be honest, the UK has had, and likely still has, plenty of spies meddling in Russian affairs too.

There is really no strategic benefit to the UK of kicking up fuss with a global power like Russia except to score some brownie points from our "closest ally" and satisfy those who have never grasped that the Berlin Wall fell almost 3 decades ago.


UK kicking up a fuss with a "Global Power", you really need to realise the role of the United Kingdom in the grand scheme of things.
You are indeed defending 'Anyone' who carries out nerve agent attacks because in real terms there ay that many countries who have the capability and the drive to do so on our Sovereign soil, but may I refer you to the latest comments of our foreign secretary fool who has publicly outed Russia.

As I have said mate defend the interests of your own country instead of supporting the nonsense of its enemies.
I say these things after sitting and listening to a gentleman I once met in a previous life called Apti Batalov.

_________________
There is no substitute for hard work.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 11:34 pm 
Offline
Manager
Manager

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 1:38 am
Posts: 15298
Location: Moved
I am rather honoured to be a citizen of a country that " kicks up a fuss " when another country uses nerve agents on it's soil.

_________________
Dyslexics are teople poo


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post Posted: Sat Mar 17, 2018 12:07 am 
Offline
Manager
Manager
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2004 7:19 am
Posts: 22597
Location: Cannock.
"I have now received confirmation from a well placed FCO source that Porton Down scientists are not able to identify the nerve gas as being of Russian manufacture, and have been resentful of the pressure being placed on them to do so.

Craig Murray - former British Ambassador.

_________________
Wolves fans, this is your day. Its going to be emotional.

If team culture is weak losing divides the team. If team culture is strong, losing creates the hunger to win again. Either way culture rules.


Top 
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 543 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19  Next

Board index » GENERAL CHAT » The news stand


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

 
 

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

The Wolf will always be free to its members, but if you feel you would like to contribute towards the running costs, than please feel free to donate.

 

 

Disclaimer : This forum is for the general discussion/topic of Wolverhampton Wanderers. What is said within the forum is personal opinions, and The Wolf will not be held responsible. Your ip is logged for security reasons. The forum is viewable by the public and any topics you disclose/discuss can be viewed by the public. Some topics on this forum may only be suitable for those aged 18+.